The Art of the Blur

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© Sharon Brown Christopher All rights reserved

It was a return trip to a local antique store to photograph with the abstract photography group of which I am a member that caused me to think out side the box. Having photographed abstractly twice before in the same place, I was feeling a need for a new approach.

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© Sharon Brown Christopher All rights reserved

So, using some of the principles of composition such as line, balance, perspective, pattern, symmetry, shape, color, texture, tone, form, space, and depth, I decided to dedicate the day to blur, intentionally photographing  all my subjects without focus.

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© Sharon Brown Christopher All rights reserved

Those who understand photography only as a means of reporting or documenting may struggle with this experience.

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© Sharon Brown Christopher All rights reserved

Rather, than describing, blurred photography expresses.

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© Sharon Brown Christopher All rights reserved

My shift from documentation to emotion, from description to expression opened the faucet of my creativity flow for the day and turned what could have been a frustrating exercise into a playful, joyful one.

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©Sharon Brown Christopher All rights reserved

Contributed by Sharon Brown Christopher

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4 thoughts on “The Art of the Blur

    1. sabc123

      Anita, I have indeed used several of my blurs as textures. However, I’m asking the question, “Can blurs stand alone as fine art photography?” As far as my blurs are concerned, the jury is still out. I’ll continue to experiment, however.

      Reply
  1. sabc123

    Anita, I have used several of these blurs as textures. However, the question I am asking is, “Can abstracts stand alone as fine art photography?” As far as my blurs are concerned, the jury is still out. Thanks for your reply.

    Reply
  2. Bonney Oelschlager

    The following statement from you expresses my response to this work.
    “Rather, than describing, blurred photography expresses.”
    I found myself ‘feeling’ rather than ‘thinking’ about, when I perused your work. Nice distraction from left brain reactions for me.

    Reply

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